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Resident Events is a resource for property management professionals to find, share, and rate community events and apartment party ideas with each other!  Need some community event ideas?  Just take a look around!

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5 days ago
Holiday Bazaar and Toys for Tots Fundraiser 5 days ago

A well-planned bazaar and fundraiser during the holiday season will catch donors and attendees when they are already in a giving mood. At the same time, the holiday season is always busy so it’s best to plan the event well in advance so that there will be less chance of a conflict with your resident attendees Here are a few tips for planning a non-profit bazaar in your community that can hold space as a fun and successful event.

Guests

Decide if your event will be open only to residents, or if you will open it up to other community members as well. You may decide on a compromise and insist that each resident is allowed to bring one or two “guests” to the event from outside the community. This can allow residents to bring partners, friends, family members, or any other guests others who may enjoy the event and/or donate to the cause.

Image source: Pixabay

Getting the word out

Advertise well in advance of the day so that community members can get the event on their calendars and be sure to make time to stop by. Print postcards, hang flyers, and make sure you announce the event in your newsletter and on social media.

Set up a page on your website with all the most frequently asked questions and most important information. You can direct all inquiries to the page for answers to their questions.

Ensure that you co-ordinate your efforts with the charity you’re planning to support so that they can advertise the event in their network as well – especially if you’ve decided to open your event to the greater community.

Choosing a theme

While a theme is not required for your holiday bazaar, you may want to consider at least a color scheme to keep things looking cohesive.

If you want to get more elaborate you can check out some of these amazing event ideas and party themes that include everything from black and white, to movie-inspired.

Booking Vendors

This event functions as a craft and holiday bazaar, so one of the key components it to rent booth space to local artists and artisans.

Allow chamber connections and other resident businesses to rent table and booth space to display holiday gifts for sale. Reach out to local home-based businesses in your community, like AVON, Cookie Lee, Shakeology, personal trainers, etc.

Image source: Pixabay

Consider listing your event on www.craftlister.com for free. You can also search this site for local vendors and send personal invitations. To find additional potential vendors, search websites like www.etsy.com for local and handmade businesses by clicking on “buy” and then “search local.” Send invitations to local crafters who make cute handmade items and ask them to participate – don’t forget to include your website and e-mail address so crafters can get back to you with any questions.

**TIP** Keep the booth rental fee low to encourage participation. No more than $30 for a table, chair, and advertising. This will get more people interested in participating, yet still ensure that you have enough funds for other aspects of the event. Anything left over at the end of the event can be donated to charity as well.

Also, remember that the size of the booth spaces is a very big deal, so be sure that the boundaries of each booth are clearly marked out. If you are holding the event indoors this can be easily accomplished by measuring and marking the floor of each space with masking tape.

Ensuring donations

The best way to make sure you get as many donations as needed is to set a target well before the event. If you want 50-100 toys, then aim to reach out to ten times as many potential visitors. In lieu of cash, for entry into the event you can require an unwrapped toy above a certain dollar amount, and collect those toys for the charity of your choice.

Additionally, because of the low booth rental fee, you may want to require vendors pay a certain percentage of their total sales – five to ten percent is a good amount - to the chosen charity.

If you want to only collect money in donations for a local charity you can set a ticket price.

Entertainment

Depending on your community demographics and the type of people you expect at your fundraising bazaar, book appropriate activities and entertainment as needed. If you have a mixed crowd your best bet is to cater to the younger more active audience.

Connecting with guests

Before the event is over get commitment from attendees that they will continue to support the charity in the future. Since this event is a fundraiser their commitment could come in the form of an additional donation, but it doesn’t have end with that.

Encourage volunteer pledges or get attendees to do something as simple as signing up for a mailing list. By the end of the event, residents should be excited about the ongoing plans and eager to help in new ways.

 

 

2 weeks ago
December Rotating Art Exhibition 2 weeks ago

The holiday season is a great time to start a rotating art exhibition showcasing local artist and artists on a monthly, or bi-monthly, basis.

You can organize the exhibitions yourself, seek volunteers from your resident community to help manage the events, or seek out students from a local arts department. **TIP** Find out if your local community has an "Art Walk" day or something similar (usually the first or second Saturday of the month) and time your exhibitions and opening shows to correspond to that city-wide event. 

To host an art exhibition in your lobby area there are a few things you’ll want to consider. 

Finding artists

There are many different ways to find artists and structure the exhibitions.

Image source: Pixabay                      

One way is to put together group shows on particular themes. The advantage of group shows is that when more artists are involved, there is a much better chance that there will be some style of artwork that everyone likes.

Alternatively, you can also feature one artist at a time and really showcase their style and take an in-depth look at their art works. If you choose your artists wisely you will be able to feature work that you know your communities will like. Listen to feedback from residents to get a better feel for the styles that are more popular as well, this will give you a better idea of which types of artists to include in the future.

You can search for artists my attending other local art exhibitions, speaking with graduate students at the local colleges, and visiting crafting and artist guilds and organizations in your area. Put a call out for artists on your website and social media pages, and also advertise in online artist publications.

Gathering and hanging work

Once you’ve put together an artist exhibition schedule, be sure to request that the art be delivered to your community about a week in advance. This will give you time to inventory and hang the work in the exhibition space.

Image source: Pixabay

Depending on the amount of available wall space and accessibility, you can either install the art on easels, or hang art on the walls for a more professional look. If wall hanging, consult your local picture framing shop or art gallery for hanging guidelines and purchase of special weight-supporting hooks – especially if hanging in drywall. Clearly label each work of art with the title, artist name, medium (material that the art was created with), size, and price (if applicable). You can print of this information on small labels and affix them directly to the wall near each artwork.

Advertising the exhibition

There are a few ways that you can advertise your rotating exhibitions to get more attention and establish yourself as a local art venue.

Consider sending press releases to local newspaper and magazines and sharing about the exhibition on social media.

Creating postcards for the artist to mail out and share with their network. Vistaprint is a quick and easy resource for making high quality postcards on a small budget. You can keep some in the office to advertise the next exhibition and hand out to interested residents. All of these tips will ensure that residents and the local community is aware of each exhibition well in advance so they can plan to attend the opening reception each month.

Opening night

If you’ve only invited local artists to participate and attend, you can encourage them to speak with attendees during the artist reception.

Image course: Pixabay

If any of the artist have a particularly interesting style or technique you may also want to ask them to give live demos or present a short talk during the opening exhibition.

Managing sales

Decide in advance who will be responsible for sales. If anyone is interested in purchasing a work of art will you process it through your office and take a commission, or will you hand over the interested buyer’s contact details to the artist and have them handle the transaction?

Regardless of how you decide to approach sales, never disrupt the integrity of the exhibition by removing any of the works of art until the exhibition is finished. Buyers can pick up any purchases works at the end of the exhibition.

Booooo! This quiz sucks

3 weeks ago
Create a Homework Hub and Study Space in Your Community 3 weeks ago

To craft a family-friendly community, consider creating a space for tutoring and homework in the clubhouse after school hours and before closing up office. On weekdays, 2-4 PM or 3-5 PM are good timings to try. 

There are lots of ways to make your homework and study space a success. To pull it off you will need to rely on community volunteers or possibly take in donations to make it a fully self-sustaining space.

Here are some of the most important considerations for creating a space that children and teens will love to study in.

Gather supplies

Offer plenty of standard school supplies like: 

  • Construction paper
  • Graph paper
  • Notecards
  • Raised line binder paper
  • Pencils with grips and tri-write pencils
  • Erasers
  • Highlighters
  • Workbooks for preschoolers through sixth grade
  • Whiteboards and markers
  • Calculators
  • Protractors and rulers
  • Glue
  • Scissors
     

**TIP** Keep supplies in carry cases or covered bins for easy storage and cleanup when not in use.

Create a research-focused computer

If you have a computer on site, make sure it's available for student research during the homework and study hours. This can be a valuable sales tool when it comes to showing your community features to potential residents.

 

**TIP** Require students to pre-register to use the computer(s) for research in 30 minute slots. Not only will this keep the computer use organized and ensure everyone get’s a turn it will also encourage participants to get there early to ensure they get a research spot.

Consider installing research tools and software to make the computers more student-friendly. Programs like Boardmaker; Earobics; Lexia; and Typing Instructor for Kids are all great programs that can help student excel in school.

**TIP** Ensure internet browsers like Firefox, and Chrome are installed, and set parental controls during study hours to ensure students are not accessing things inappropriate for their ages.

Create a research-focused computer

**TIP** Keep supplies in carry cases or covered bins for easy storage and cleanup when not in use.

Choosing and decorating the space

When choosing your space, consider accessibility and ease of access. Make sure you can get to and see the study space often to supervise volunteers and participants. Ensure plenty of comfortable seating, and working tables, so children can spread out and work on their projects.

  • Decorate to motivate. Put up a few motivational posters and signs at study time to help participants associate the multi-purpose space with school and study.
  • Turn on soft classical music or ambient white noise to help with concentration.
  • Make sure it’s bright enough for kids to see what they are working on - especially in the winter months when it falls dark earlier.
  • Try plugging in a gentle room freshener. Scents like lemon, lavender, jasmine, rosemary, cinnamon, and peppermint, seem to boost mood and productivity in some people.
  • Consider a clock. This can help younger students set time-related study goals, like working for 15 minutes and then taking a five minute break. A clock can motivate participants to study for an hour or more. When time is up, encourage participants to take a break to reward themselves.

**BONUS** If needed for students studying for a timed exam like the SAT or ACT stopwatches could also be made available.

Don't go overboard. Remember that the purpose of the homework hub and study space is to help residents study more effectively. Make sure the study space does not become a distraction itself.

Volunteers

To make the space as helpful as possible, offer supervised volunteer tutoring at least once or twice a week, if not every day. No matter what grade level, students can always tutor students and kids younger than them. Even middle school students can tutor younger grades. Encourage everyone to apply!

Enlist

To find volunteers, send out requests for tutors and supervisors who can help you keep an eye on the kids while also offering help and advice of homework from their personal experience. Potential tutors can include parents, high school and college students, and older adults in your community.

Organize

The easiest way to organize the volunteers is to create schedules for the volunteer tutors and find the days and times that work best for their schedules. You can recruit through your monthly newsletter, social media pages, and even door to door flyers.

Offer incentives

To entice volunteer participation, offer community service certificates and letters of recommendation to all participants who volunteer with the program for a certain number of weeks or months. This type of community service can help older students accrue any required community service hours needed for graduation and also looks great for resumes and college applications. As an added bonus, parents will know that their teen is not going far to do their community service, they are still right there on the property.

**BONUS** To further encourage participation create incentive programs in partnership with local businesses and restaurants to reward students for regular participation in the homework hub. Have them sign in when they arrive, and out when they leave, to maintain accurate participation records.

**TIP** Regularly reach out to parents to inquire if their student’s grades and performance are improving in school. It’s good to know that everyone’s efforts are being rewarded. Get testimonials that you can use on your website and social media pages and share about your accomplishments and successes!
 

3 weeks ago
Veterans Day Storytelling 3 weeks ago

In honor of Veterans Day, consider holding a veteran-themed event like a storytelling initiative. This event is particularly perfect for communities with large senior populations. It’s also equally fun when advertised in advance and opened up to the surrounding greater community and older family members of your current residents. How to get started There are two ways to host a Veteran’s Day storytelling event:

  • Invite an organization like StoryCorps to the property.
  • Arrange your own oral history event.

**BONUS** Encourage residents to bring over parents, grandparents, and other elderly family members to share their stories. Take an oral history

Encouraging oral history-taking is a service to the community, and a national imperative.

Some organizations, like the Veterans History Project (with the Library of Congress) and StoryCorps, aim to go out into communities and collect very intimate and personal interviews. The goal is to create a massive archive of oral histories for generations to come. There are also non-profit organizations working to record stories and preserve them for generations to come.

**TIP** reach out to local libraries, veterans groups, and museums are also interested in collecting oral histories from veterans. Contact local chapters of veterans associations to make plans to collaborate.

How storytelling can help

Copyright-free image: https://pixabay.com/en/flag-flags-stars-stripes-america-216887/

Some veterans and older adults may not have the vision or hand-eye coordination left to write or type their memoirs. Therefore, dictating their oral history to an avid listener, like a family member or friend, is a great way to document their experiences.

Taking an oral history and listening to elder’s stories is also a way to ask somewhat personal questions, give feedback on answers, and discuss and learn from the past. Ensure the veterans are comfortable

Be sure to have snacks, water, and comfortable places to sit for all veterans and seniors participating. You want to make sure they feel comfortable so be sure to turn on the heat (or air conditioning) to ensure an even indoor temperature.

What questions to ask?

Give residents a list of oral history starter questions like those on this list from the Grosse Point Historical Society. Have residents note down the answers. They may also want to voice record, or video record, their family members.

Copyright-free image: https://pixabay.com/en/flag-memorial-honor-american-958343/

There are also specific questions to ask veterans. This guide to veteran interviewing from the Veteran’s History Project is a great start. Make sure your residents look over the questions ahead of time and plan their interviews. Asking questions in stages during the interview will help bring back memories in a natural way. It will also help keep elder’s brains agile and deepen family bonds.

If you record the conversations oral histories also make a great record for their family and future generations to access as well.

If the veteran or older adult lived through an especially difficult time period, or survived a war, allowing them the extra change to talk through some of those painful experiences can also help them find closure on past events, and bring them peace of mind. However, note that questions like "have you ever killed someone", or "how many people did you kill in the war" are not appropriate. Be prepared if someone in the group asks that, and have a pre-determined response to steer the conversation back to areas that are more in tune with the goal of the event.

**TIP** Be sure to have tissues and water around to comfort the seniors should memories get emotionally challenging to recall!

Empowering the senior in your community to share their treasured memories can bring renewed purpose, connection, and closure to their life. It can also build community partnerships and renew family bonds.

There is no better way to honor the sacrifices and memory of veterans than preserving and sharing their stories. Understanding war and other difficult past events can help us shape a more just and compassionate world.

4 weeks ago
4 weeks ago
Fall Frolic - October Craft Party 4 weeks ago

As our resident communities head into the fall season, it’s fun to get in the spirit of cooler weather with some creative crafts. This is easily turned into a monthly recurring event to encourage crafters to come by the clubhouse on a more regular basis.

How to get started

For an October craft party the focus is on setting up a few stations for different nature-based and tactile crafts that are easy projects for children and also interesting for adults as well.
Here are some ideas of craft stations to put together…
DIY Leaf Bowl

With this quick project you need either real or artificial leaves, hot glue or Mod Podge, and some balloons.

Image source: Hello Lucky

To make the bowl:
1. Blow up the balloon and tie it off.
2. Slowly add individual leaves and glue, being sure to overlap as you go. If you’re using real leaves, aim for softer fresher leaves before they get too try to maneuver and bend.
3. Next, shape he leaves into a half-balloon shaped bowl gluing as you go.
4. If you are using Mod Podge, be sure to leave to dry as per instructions on the bottle.
A hot-glued bowl can be used immediately for candy, coins, a bouquet of fall flowers, or even a cover for a smaller bowl of fruits and squash.
Here’s a video to walk you through the steps.
Alternatively, you can also have children and adults fix leaves to a paper plate ring to make an impromptu fall wreath.
Paper Plate Fall Wreath

Image credit: Family Corner

Materials needed:
• Fresh fall leaves in various colors
• Paper plate
• White school glue
• Scissors
• Pretty ribbon

Instructions for the leaf wreath:

1. Start by collecting about twenty fresh and colorful leaves from outside.
2. Cut the middle out of a paper plate by folding the plate in half and starting the cut right in the middle. Work your way around the rim to leave about a two inch paper plate border.
3. Add leavea to the plate with glue in layers. Be sure to slightly overlap the leaves. For consistency’s sake you may want to ensure that they stems are all pointed out, or inward. You can also cut of the leaf stems completely for a less jagged look.
4. Tie your pretty ribbon in a smart-looking bow and attach it to the bottom of the wreath.
Pine Cone Bird Feeders

For these wonderful bird treats you’ll need collected pine cones as well as regional birdseed and peanut butter for sticking the bird seed to the cones. You will also need string, twine, or ribbon to tie to the top of the pinecones in order to hang them outside.

Image source: Freebie Finding Mom

Instructions:
1. Be sure that all surfaces are protected and you’ve assembled all the materials.
2. Cut a 12” to 20” length of string, rope, twine, or ribbon to tie around the top of the pine cones. Make sure they are long enough to hook over a tree branch and also dangle free.
3. Take your hanging material and wrap and knot it around the very top part of the pine cone.
***TIP*** Make sure you do this step first because waiting to tie on the string or rope afterwards could get super messy!
4. Spread peanut butter over the pine cones using a butter knife, spoon, or small spatula.
***TIP*** Note that a little bit of peanut butter is all that’s needed here, the less you give the kids the smaller mess they can make. Also, keep in mind that the birds won’t know the difference when it comes to the brand or style of peanut butter, so feel free to use an inexpensive brand for this project.
5. In a small bowl, put a bit of the birdseed and then roll the pinecones around inside the seeds. The birdseed should stick to all the places the peanut butter was applied. You can also sprinkle birdseed on the pinecone as well, but this is not as strong (or drip-proof) as really pressing the seeds into the peanut butter coating.
6. Hang them up immediately in a sport of your choosing. Try to find a place that you watch the birds enjoying their treat and consider hanging it in front of a window or across from a favorite park bench.
Homemade Glow in the Dark Slime Recipe

Another playful fall favorite is homemade glow in the dark slime.

Image and recipe source: A Pumpkin and a Princess

The materials and ingredients include Elmer’s white glue, glow in the dark paint, neon food coloring, borax, and water. It’s an easy project and you just need to follow along with the full instructions.
This is a simple recipe that makes about two cups of slime and can be shared with multiple residents after making the big batch. Like all chemical reaction crafts, this project is best made with adult supervision.

No matter which crafts you choose, parents and kids are both guaranteed to have a blast. As with all crafty gatherings, be sure to cover all surfaces to protect furniture, or find a safe outdoor place to conduct these crafts for easier cleanup. Have a craft-tastic time!

Scavenger HUNT 1 month ago

My community is centered around our university and I have always had the idea to get our community more involved in the larger community. My residents are majority graduate students that take their studies very seriously. The majority of my residents are always considered part-time residents of Ohio as they only live here during the school year and go home so many of them do not take advantage of everything our city has to offer. I had always planned on doing a scavenger hunt around the city partnering with other businesses and apartment communities to compete against one another. We would market the scavenger hunt in all places which would get your name out there and help the other businesses as well. Each business would contribute something towards the grand prize, Second Prize, and Third Prize... be it gift cards, tshirts, cups, food... etc. Then after the scavenger hunt a huge party with everything supplied by the businesses. It makes everyone familiar with the local businesses as well as supporting your business. With enough contributors it can become an annual event with a lot of great press!

Snacks & Studying! 1 month ago

Since exams are this week, we hosted a study party in our small clubhouse. We pitched it as an opportunity to study someplace quiet. We offered healthy snacks like dried fruit, trail mix, nuts and granola bars as well as some sugary candy. I think the biggest draw for our residents was that we also offered free coffee and energy drinks. In order to make the party as convenient as possible we extended office hours until 9 so people could use our wifi and printers for last minute studying. We will definitely do this again in the spring!

Scavenger HUNT 1 month ago

My community is centered around our university and I have always had the idea to get our community more involved in the larger community. My residents are majority graduate students that take their studies very seriously. The majority of my residents are always considered part-time residents of Ohio as they only live here during the school year and go home so many of them do not take advantage of everything our city has to offer. I had always planned on doing a scavenger hunt around the city partnering with other businesses and apartment communities to compete against one another. We would market the scavenger hunt in all places which would get your name out there and help the other businesses as well. Each business would contribute something towards the grand prize, Second Prize, and Third Prize... be it gift cards, tshirts, cups, food... etc. Then after the scavenger hunt a huge party with everything supplied by the businesses. It makes everyone familiar with the local businesses as well as supporting your business. With enough contributors it can become an annual event with a lot of great press!

Hot Chocolate Bar For Your Winter Apartment Community Party 1 month ago

Get prepared for winter by planning a hot chocolate bar during your winter party!  We found this idea at Indianapoluxe and love their take on a simple hot chocolate!  Rather than simply providing hot chocolate, they give everybody the chance to customize it to their preferences by adding peppermint, peanut butter, marshmallows, or caramel.

This is one of those small elements of an apartment party that isn't huge in itself, but adds a little magic to the event.
 

What other ingredients would be good to add?

 

 

Resident Portal Bingo 1 month ago

We place a Bingo Number up on your website everyday each month until someone gets a BINGO and that person wins a prize! We do this each month. It keeps residents coming to the website to see what's happening at the community.

Only $104 for 9000 cards plus a whole lot more.

Keeps residents coming to Resident Portal page EVERYDAY!!!

Takes no effort at all...hand out cards and date the back...post a new # each day. EASY!!!!

1 month ago
1 month ago
1 month ago
Smash It, Don’t Trash It, Pumpkin Smash 1 month ago

This is a perfect post Halloween pumpkin disposal event.

 

Rather than seeing those outdoor pumpkins rotting on stoops and sidewalks, encourage residents to bring their decorated, carved, un-carved, and misshapen pumpkins to the centrally located pumpkin smash.

 

***TIP*** Reach out the manager of a local grocery store to discuss a discounted rate for any remaining pumpkins they have that did not sell.



***TIP*** In order to make this as easy and clean-up friendly as possible, you may want to consider keeping the pumpkin smashing to a certain designated area, like on a few large tarps – for easier clean up.

 

The tools are simple and all residents need is do is supply the pumpkins!


***TIP*** Encourage residents to wear old clothes and sturdy shoes if they will be jumping and stomping around in the pumpkin guts. 

There dozens of ways to demolish a pumpkin, here are a few ideas to get the wheels turning for you. There are sure to be a few that work for your community.

 

Reverse Pumpkin Darts

Source: Penn Live

This game involves throwing pumpkins at darts, instead of the other way around. After aiming and throwing a pumpkin at the middle of the board, will the pumpkin stick to the board, or fall to the ground in a million gooey pieces?

***TIP*** Instead of actual darts (which could get pricey and also not work well) you can construct a board with dozens of super long nails hammered through the backside and pointing out the front. Just make sure to have the area secured so that a resident can't accidentally fall into it!

 

Pumpkin Shot Put

Source: Peddie Voices

While the Olympics may be over, there is still one more place for some competitive games – your own resident community!

Have residents chuck their pumpkin as far as they can into an open area. Mark all landing spots with a small flag stating the participant’s name and age. At the end of the event you can award prizes for the farthest toss in each age category.

Be sure to be inclusive and encourage participation from all ages and abilities by having a few different size pumpkins on hand for throwing.

 

Pumpkin Bowling

Image source: YouTube

Pumpkin bowling is another great way to play with the pumpkins and works very similar to regular bowling. Instead of a bowling ball youngsters can roll a pumpkin down the alley to hit the pins. Construct a plywood bowling alley and purchase some bowling pins from a local or online shop.

This is an easier activity for the younger kids (10 and under crowd) but is perfect for all ages.

Pumpkin Drop

 

If you have any tall ladders, two story buildings, cherry pickers, or scaffolding at your community you can plan for a giant pumpkin drop.

This is an activity where resident pumpkins are dropped from a very high place to a target below. The bigger the pumpkin - the better the splat!

Source: Chester County Moms

***BONUS***
Encourage residents to write something funny on their pumpkins that can be read aloud before hurling the pumpkin to the ground below.

 

Another great crowd pleaser is to drop a considerably larger pumpkin to the ground at the very end of the event for a dramatic finale.

Pumpkin Smashing

Stock up on a few rubber mallets for pumpkin smashing. Have a few cricket or baseball bats available for smashing as well. As always, when you have bats and mallets swinging around, plan for lots of supervision at this part of the event! This is perfect for older kids and adults alike so let everyone join in with the fun.

This is 1970s entertainment for you, and a watermelon of course, but you get the idea…

https://giphy.com/gifs/W4TQkqflLmCkM

***TIP*** Remember, this even can get a bit wild and slippery. Here are a few ways to manage residents and prevent accidents:

1.      Keep areas as clean as possible by sweeping pumpkin guts out of the way frequently.

2.      Encourage residents to be careful around the destruction zones by setting up caution tape around more dangerous areas.

3.      Assign staff to monitor children and prevent them from wandering into danger zones.

 

There may be no sound better than the sound of a squishy cracking pumpkin. This event means lots of fun for little ones and stress relief for the adults! Have a smashing good time!

1 month ago
Host a Cosplay Game Night! 1 month ago

Image source: Archer Cosplay by Patrick Imbeau via Flickr

 

What is cosplay?

Cosplay is a contraction of the words costume and play. The practice includes dressing up as a character from a movie, book, or video game - especially characters from the Japanese genres of manga and anime.

Cosplay can involve anything from the simplest of costumes and designs that any true fan would recognize, to the most elaborate transformations - with hair, makeup, wigs, shoes, and other props typically adding massive interest to the elaborateness of the costume design.

How to get started…

Cosplay is about dressing up as your favorite character, going out and having fun. It’s also about getting lots of pictures and hanging out with other people with similar interests.

To host a cosplay night in your community, put a call out to residents to gauge interest. There may be cosplayers in your community already who would love the chance to make new friends.
You may also want to explain the concept for those not initiated and encourage additional new participants.

Choosing characters

 

When residents are putting together their costumes there are a few things to consider. These include personal skills, budget, and time. Here are a few more tips.

 

 

 

 

Image source: Deviant Art

**TIP** Only choose a character you like. If you choose to make a costume for a character you hate, you may end up getting frustrated or bored part of the way through and never finish.

When helping residents choose their characters and make their own costumes it may be helpful to point them in the direction of
basic costume tutorial sites and ideas and forums for cosplayers so they can work on crafting a truly imaginative outfit.

It’s not just about the costume. Cosplay is also a performance of sorts. Encourage residents to learn their character’s accent, and try to move and act like their character as well. Cosplay is usually more than just a costume, it’s a way to cut loose and pretend to be another person, or character, for a few hours.

One of the most important things to remember is that cosplayers don't have to look like the original actors. They don't have to be body builders, super skinny, or Victoria's Secret models. They can just be average Jane and Joes who have amazing costumes and the skills and put something together.

Attendance and Marketing

Cosplaying definitely skews younger, so this event definitely trends towards Millennials and would be a great addition for a student housing property.  However, that doesn't mean that traditional communities can't take part.  Within  your community, you might only have a certain number of residents who are willing to take the time to create a costume and participate, so this type of event is GREAT as a marketing and outreach event!  In other words, open your doors to the wider area to draw in cosplayers from even competing communities, so they can see what type of community and culture you have!

Games

Games are a must-have for any meetup event. You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to buy masses of board games, there are plenty of other free games to play as well. Here are a few free game ideas that are free, fun, and get people moving. [source: Money Crashers]

 

Never Have I Ever
This game is best played with at least a dozen people, preferably more. The concept is similar to musical chairs in that there is one less chair than there are people. Arrange the chairs in a circle looking inward. One person stands in the middle and announces one thing that they have never done. For instance, the person in the middle might announce, “Never have I ever ridden in a hot air balloon.” Anyone who has ridden in a hot air balloon would then get up, leaving their chair unoccupied, and find a new chair. The person in the middle would also find a chair. Whoever is left without a chair is the new person in the middle and will take a turn announcing what they have never done.

 

Image source: YouTube

Would You Rather
The more creative you are, the more fun this game can be. For this game, the players move to one side of the room or another depending on what they prefer given two options. For example, the first set of options might be wearing shoes or going barefoot. The person who is “it” would announce, “Would you rather wear shoes or go barefoot?” If your answer is you prefer to wear shoes, you would go to the left, but if you would rather be barefoot, you would go to the right. Keep track of the answers to see who has the most in common with each other.

Things
If you have ever played
The Game of Things, you’ll be able to play this version of the game. Instead of paying full price for the actual game, just make up the questions yourself. One person is “it” and will say a statement that will have a thing as the answer, such as “Things you shouldn’t do while at work.” Everyone then writes on a piece of paper something that shouldn’t be done at work, such as sleep. The person who is “it” then collects all the answers and reads them out loud. Then, go around the room letting people guess a match up of a person and an answer. If they are correct, that person gets a point, and the person whose answer was guessed is out. Continue going around the room until one person is left. That person gets three points.

 

Image source: YouTube

Would You Rather
The more creative you are, the more fun this game can be. For this game, the players move to one side of the room or another depending on what they prefer given two options. For example, the first set of options might be wearing shoes or going barefoot. The person who is “it” would announce, “Would you rather wear shoes or go barefoot?” If your answer is you prefer to wear shoes, you would go to the left, but if you would rather be barefoot, you would go to the right. Keep track of the answers to see who has the most in common with each other.

Things
If you have ever played
The Game of Things, you’ll be able to play this version of the game. Instead of paying full price for the actual game, just make up the questions yourself. One person is “it” and will say a statement that will have a thing as the answer, such as “Things you shouldn’t do while at work.” Everyone then writes on a piece of paper something that shouldn’t be done at work, such as sleep. The person who is “it” then collects all the answers and reads them out loud. Then, go around the room letting people guess a match up of a person and an answer. If they are correct, that person gets a point, and the person whose answer was guessed is out. Continue going around the room until one person is left. That person gets three points.

It’s all about the photos! 

 

Image source: Pinterest

On the day, or probably evening, of the event, be sure to take lots of photos of all those in attendance. Make sure you get their full character names and also their social accounts (if they are willing to share) so that they can further connect with other cosplayers after the event and be featured on your social pages.

Key things to remember

As any cosplayer will tell you, cosplay does not equal consent. Just because a person is wearing a costume that you find interesting or exciting, does not mean that you have the right to touch, hold, grab, or hug that person for photos or anything else. Always ask permission before touching anything, including their costume and props. Also, take care to be mindful when it comes to comments about costumes, most cosplayers put a lot of effort into their costumes. If you don’t know how to talk to someone in costume, here are a few tips.

 

Cosplay is a great way to leave work and worries behind to step outside yourself and become someone else for a few hours of fun and games. With some careful planning and some fun games, all the residents will have a great night!

 

 

Sidewalk Chalk Art Festival 1 month ago

My inspiration comes from the Denver Chalk Art Festival. (http://www.denverchalkart.com) Contact your local High School and college art department. Have local businesses donate prizes for the contest.

Have an area set up for the HS artists and another area for colleges artist. Set up a special area for the residents of your community~~especially a children’s area!! This will get folks to travel all over your property.
Have residents volunteer to help as community ambassadors and show folks around. Find someone with a Hot Dog Cart that can go through out the community. In the club house have light refreshments for your guests.
Call the newspaper and TV stations. Pictures and free air time is always a plus.

Supply sidewalk chalk for the kids on your property.
Give away chalk boards and chalk to prospects~~of course they will be customized to your property.

Ice Cream Truck 1 month ago

Decorate a community golf cart in fun and bright colors then drive circles throughout the property with a cooler filled with icy treats. Hand them out to residents as they pass by or come home from work for a nice cool surprise for your residents as they come home from a long hard day at the office. A boombox with an Ice Cream Truck song plays repeatedly as you make your rounds for an hour or until the treats are gone. This is a quick and easy event on a hot summer day, particularly for properties with kids! Wear your community logo t-shirt or polo, wear that so you can obtain the highest visibility for your community.

Holiday Food Drive and Raffle 1 month ago

My community is currently hosting a food drive for our local food bank.  The leasing office did a little research to see which organizations were in need of donations for the holidays.  It was easy to get the information for our local food bank and setup minor details such as picking up the food barrel & arranging for a pick-up at the end of the drive.  We made flyers to pass out to each home and post throughout the community.  The food bank also had tools online such as what items they needed and posters we could print out for free.  To 'up the ante' a bit we also organized a raffle to go with it.  For each item that is brought into the office the resident's name will go into the raffle one time.  Winners will be chosen at random and receive a $25 gift card (or any prize that works for your community).  The food drive raffle will be going on throughout the month of November.  We have more than a week yet and an almost full barrel!

Hello! I'm now working at Mountain View Meadows--a subdivision development in Helena. I know that a few of you might be interested in checking out... Show more

Daily Bingo and Trivia 2 months ago

Hand out bingo cards to your residents or have them available in the office for pick up for those who would like to participate.  Then, everyday, post a number on Facebook or mass email the bingo numbers, or post them somewhere where residents would see them (maybe close to the mailboxes).  When  someone gets a BINGO, give out small door prizes or any other awards that you feel are appropriate.  This is a great way to get people involved in your community.  By having them utilize your Facebook Page for a game, they will also have access to it for other events and notifications you plan to post.

If you would like a daily game, you could also use this for Trivia and have smaller prizes for those who participate!

The inspiration for this event came from Verla Shafer, Property Manager for Advenir at Casa Bella.

Holiday Gift Wrapping Party 2 months ago

This is a great way to create an environment for residents to get to know one another while also helping them adhere to their Christmas budgets. Go buy wrapping paper, bows, to/from stickers, tape, scissors, and a few other miscellaneous wrapping supplies and set it all up in the clubhouse at your complex. Play Christmas music and serve Christmas cookies and hot chocolate while residents come as they please (open house style) and use free supplies to wrap their gifts.

You can also use this time to play simple get to know you games or stimulate conversation by having prepared topics like having residents share their favorite Christmas memories. It would also be fun to have Christmas trivia questions ready to ask aloud for residents to discuss.

You could even get kids around the complex (or kids from a kids club) to volunteer to help residents wrap by giving them simple projects. One kid can carry around a trash can, one can put bows on, one can put name stickers on, etc.

This event requires very little set-up and very little work throughout, so Cares Teams won't be as busy coordinating. You can use the time to get to know your residents.